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How Can a Lawyer Help Win Social Security Disability Benefits?

How Can a Lawyer Help Win Social Security Disability Benefits?

disability benefits lawyer

Applying for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits has a reputation for being a difficult process, but do you really need a lawyer in order to successfully get approved for benefits? While there’s no requirement to have your application reviewed by a Social Security disability attorney, there are a few major reasons why you might want to consider it. Learn more about the advantages of consulting a disability benefits lawyer from Social Security Disability Advocates USA. 


#1: They Can Determine Which Programs You May Be Eligible For

Before you even start filling out an application, an experienced disability benefits lawyer can help you figure out which benefit programs you might be eligible for. This might include SSDI, Supplemental Security Income, VA disability benefits, workers’ compensation, or other local assistance programs. Because the approval process for SSDI can take a while, an attorney may also be able to guide you towards other types of financial aid that you may qualify for in the meantime.


#2: They Can Review Your Application for Common Errors

The initial application for SSDI is quite lengthy. If you don’t have all the information you need before you start the process, don’t understand the instructions, or rush through it, you will likely end up with a denied claim (along with about 60% of other first-time applicants). 

With the odds stacked against you, you need to make sure that your application is complete, accurate, and well-supported by appropriate evidence. An experienced disability benefits lawyer knows exactly what to look for and will ensure that your application is submitted correctly the first time. They will also look over your entire application for common errors, missing information, and anything else that might compromise your approval.


#3: They Can Help You Properly Document Your Claim

In addition to information about your disability, your application must also include all relevant personal information, banking information, family details, a thorough education and work history, and a plethora of medical records relating to your diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, etc. Tracking down and coordinating all of this information could easily overwhelm anyone, let alone someone who may also be suffering from physical, mental, or emotional symptoms related to their disability.

When you hire a disability benefits lawyer, you’re not just choosing someone who will show up in a suit at a hearing. You’re also consulting with an organized professional—one who can assist you in sourcing and obtaining the medical records, doctor’s notes, hospitalization history, tax records, work and salary verification, diplomas or certificates, and any other evidence that will prove to the Social Security Administration that your condition meets their stringent requirements to qualify for disability.


#4: They’ll Represent You at an Appeals Hearing

The first step in the appeals process after receiving a denial letter from the Social Security Administration is to ask for a reconsideration. This level of appeal involves a complete review of your original application and supporting documents by an employee who did not take part in the original evaluation of your claim. If time has passed and you now have additional supporting information, you can include it in the reconsideration. 

If you submitted your application on your own and were denied, this is a good time to consult a disability benefits lawyer, as a few key pieces of evidence may be the difference between yet another denial and being approved for monthly benefits.

If you’re still denied benefits after a reconsideration, you will need to appear at a hearing by an administrative law judge. You and your attorney will have another chance to present new evidence and submit a persuasive legal brief. Witnesses, such as doctors or vocational experts, will also have the opportunity to testify to the credibility and severity of your disability. Your lawyer can ask them questions and answer questions from the judge on your behalf. Should your claim be denied again, a disability benefits lawyer will be essential in the appeals that follow, including appearing before the Appeals Council or even the Federal District Court. 


#5: They’ll Always Be Thinking One Step Ahead

There’s no sugar coating the fact that getting approved for SSDI benefits can take months or years to accomplish. Being successful requires legal knowledge, attention to detail, patience, and tenacity. Despite qualifying for disability being a sometimes lengthy process, it’s very easy to lose track of important deadlines throughout your application, reconsideration, and the rest of the appeals process. 

Missing one of these deadlines—or not being prepared for the next step in your case—can destroy a valid claim all too easily. With an accomplished disability benefits lawyer in your corner, you can rest assured that your claim will be taken care of without unexpected pitfalls.


Talk to a Disability Benefits Lawyer Today

To get help with applying for disability benefits or appealing a denial, contact a Social Security disability lawyer today. Social Security Disability Advocates USA offers free consultations to help you sort out fact from fiction when it comes to qualifying for and maximizing your monthly SSDI benefits. There’s no hidden fee and no obligation to utilize our legal services—just quality legal advice from a compassionate and dedicated law firm.

To get in touch with a member of our team, give us a call 24/7 at 602-952-3200. Representatives are also standing by via LiveChat to answer your questions. To request your free case review online now, simply fill out this form

This is attorney advertising. SSDA, LLC is a group of attorneys that pursues claims for Social Security Disability benefits on behalf of its clients against the Social Security Administration. SSDA, LLC is in no way a part of the Social Security Administration. Further, the information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, a representative-client relationship.
Does a Workers’ Compensation Settlement Affect Social Security Disability?

Does a Workers’ Compensation Settlement Affect Social Security Disability?

workers' comp and disability

According to the National Safety Council (NSC), there were 4.64 million work-related medically consulted injuries in 2019. In addition, 4,572 workers died on the job from a preventable injury. In spite of increased awareness surrounding workplace safety, 2019 was the second consecutive year that preventable workplace deaths increased by 2%. 

For many workers, getting injured at work is an unfortunate setback, but many go on to make a full recovery and get back to their livelihoods. For others, though, suffering a workplace injury may mean a long-term rehabilitation process or even permanent disability. Filing for disability benefits along with payments from a workers’ compensation settlement may help you stay afloat, but there may be limitations as to how much cash assistance you can receive from these programs. Find out more about workers’ comp and disability from the legal team at Social Security Disability Advocates USA.

Can I Get Workers’ Comp and Disability at the Same Time?

Workers may be able to receive a workers’ compensation settlement (either as regular payments or as a lump sum) and also collect Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits concurrently. Both of these are public programs, but they are run by different entities and have different requirements to qualify for benefits. 

Workers’ compensation is overseen by individual U.S. states, while Social Security disability is run by the Social Security Administration, a federal program. Depending on the state you live in, you could qualify for assistance from one, both, or neither program. In addition, you may also receive disability benefits from other private and public sources, such as a private pension, Veterans Administration benefits, state and local government benefits, or Supplemental Security Income (SSI). 

Will a Workers’ Comp Settlement Decrease My Disability Benefits?

A workers’ compensation settlement does carry the possibility of reducing the amount of monthly disability benefits you can qualify for from the SSA. Whether or not this will affect you depends on several factors, including how much your workers’ comp settlement is worth and the amount of your average monthly earnings prior to being injured on the job. 

To figure out if and by how much your SSDI benefits may be reduced, add the amount of your monthly disability benefits from the SSA, your workers’ compensation payment, and other public disability payments you receive. (Private disability insurance and certain public sources like Supplemental Security Income or VA benefits don’t count towards this total.)

If the total amount of your monthly disability payments exceeds 80% of your average current earnings before you became disabled, your SSDI benefits will be reduced accordingly. 

What if I Received a Lump Sum Workers’ Comp Settlement?

Not everyone who receives workers’ comp benefits collects them in installment payments. In some cases, it may be more beneficial for you to accept a one-time lump sum payment for your workers’ compensation claim. If this is the case, then how does workers’ comp and disability affect your monthly allowance?

Most of the time, the SSA will convert your lump sum settlement into monthly installment payments for the purpose of figuring out whether or not you’re surpassing the 80% limit of average current earnings. If, for example, you had been receiving $1,100 per month in workers’ compensation and then took a lump sum payment of $22,000, the SSA will likely calculate the equivalent monthly payment of $1,100 for the next 20 months ($22,000 / $1,100 per month = 20 months). 

Will My SSDI Be Permanently Reduced Because of Workers’ Comp?

The offset of SSDI benefits to accommodate either a lump sum payment or monthly payments of a workers’ comp claim may affect your finances for a time, but this reduction in benefits is not permanent. As soon as your workers’ compensation runs out, you can notify the Social Security Administration and your monthly benefit will be increased, so long as nothing else has changed in terms of your disability.

If your workers’ comp does not run out, your benefits will change once you reach full retirement age. At this point, you will begin receiving regular Social Security benefits in lieu of SSDI benefits, and your monthly payments should increase to 100% of your maximum possible benefit.

Need Help with Workers’ Comp and Disability?

Trying to figure out how your workers’ compensation settlement will affect your Social Security disability benefits on your own can be tricky. Both programs are handled by different entities and have different rules for qualifying. In addition, your workers’ compensation settlement agreement may have its own stipulations as far as how your SSDI benefits are offset.

To get help with applying for disability benefits, calculating your average current earnings, and planning for your financial future, contact a Social Security disability lawyer today. Our law firm offers free initial consultations to help you sort out fact from fiction when it comes to qualifying for and maximizing your monthly SSDI benefits. 

Our experienced attorneys will collaborate with your workers’ comp representative to make sure you’re getting fair compensation from both your employer and the Social Security Administration. And, should you also need legal assistance to complete your workers’ comp claim, we can also connect you with a qualified workers’ compensation attorney. 

Social Security Disability Advocates USA is available around the clock 24/7 to take your call at 602-952-3200. You can also get in touch with a representative online right now by using our LiveChat service. To request your free, no obligation consultation, call today or fill out this simple request form.

This is attorney advertising. SSDA, LLC is a group of attorneys that pursues claims for Social Security Disability benefits on behalf of its clients against the Social Security Administration. SSDA, LLC is in no way a part of the Social Security Administration. Further, the information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, a representative-client relationship.
How Much Can I Earn on Social Security Disability in 2021?

How Much Can I Earn on Social Security Disability in 2021?

Before you apply for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits, one of the many considerations you’ll need to make is whether disability benefits alone will provide you with enough financial support. The maximum disability benefit amount you can receive each month (as of 2021) is $3,148. However, the average beneficiary will receive somewhere closer to $1,277 per month.

disability income limits

Of course, qualifying for SSDI benefits is contingent upon proving that you have a disabling condition which prevents you from making substantial income. But just because you are receiving disability benefits doesn’t mean you aren’t allowed to generate any income. Read on to find out about 2021 SSDI income limits and how to maximize your monthly earnings and benefits.

Disability Income Limits in 2021

It is possible to both receive disability benefits and earn income at the same time, provided that you earn under a certain amount and conform to other Social Security Administration (SSA) requirements. As of 2021, the maximum amount of money an individual can earn while receiving SSDI benefits is $1,310 for non-blind disabled workers. (Disabled workers who are blind are subject to SSDI income limits of $2,190 per month.)

If you don’t have enough work credits to qualify for SSDI but are still disabled and low income, you may qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) instead. SSI income limits are based on the federal benefit rate (FBR), which is currently $794 per month for individuals or $1,191 for couples. Earned income exclusions may make it easier for you to qualify for SSI.

Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA)

Anything beyond the disability income limit is considered to be Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA). Disabled workers who engage in SGA are at risk of losing their benefits, so it’s important to keep track of how much you’re earning if you plan to work while on disability or during the application process. You also should know about your other options for earning income and drawing disability or transitioning back into the workforce via the Ticket to Work program.

Trial Work Periods

If you’re receiving benefits but decide you want to test your ability to work, you can enroll in what’s called a trial work period. During this nine-month period, you are allowed to earn as much as you can and still receive monthly payments. As of 2021, any monthly earnings over $940 per month will automatically trigger a trial work period. The nine months of work you engage in may be consecutive or may add up to nine months of work within a 60-month period. 

SSDI income limits 2021

As long as you do not work more than nine months in this time while earning over $940 per month and you remain medically disabled, you can still collect full benefits during the trial work period. However, keep in mind that your overall monthly earnings will be evaluated by the SSA at the end of your trial work period and could lead to a termination of benefits if you’re determined to be capable of engaging in SGA—that is, if you’re consistently earning more than $1,310 per month. 

Extended Period of Eligibility

If you earn more than $940 per month during your nine-month trial work period but less than $1,310, you can qualify for an extended period of eligibility after your trial work period. This extension lasts for an additional 36 months. You’ll remain eligible to receive SSDI benefits every month, but you will not receive a payment for any month in which you earn more than 2021 SSDI income limits (i.e., more than $1,310 per month). 

If, after your 36-month extended period of eligibility, you continue to earn more than $1,310 in one month, your SSDI benefits will lapse. The good news is that, even if you do end up losing your benefits after an extended period of eligibility, you’ll be able to get approved for benefits much more quickly if you’re unable to work again in the next five years. With Expedited Reinstatement (EXR) of benefits, your condition will be reviewed again, but you’ll start receiving monthly payments immediately in the interim.

How to Make Sure You Don’t Lose Your SSDI Benefits

If you’re thinking about applying for disability but are still employed, or if you’ve been receiving benefits but are considering part-time work to help make ends meet, it’s crucial that you get all the facts before making any decisions that could put your disability benefits in jeopardy. 

To get help with applying for Social Security programs, appealing a decision, or just to talk about all your legal options, consider contacting an experienced Social Security disability lawyer at Social Security Disability Advocates USA. 

Our friendly legal team will schedule a free consultation to review your case and help you understand the possible impacts of SSDI income limits. Call us today at 602-952-3200, chat with us via LiveChat, or send us a message using our secure contact form

How Does Social Security Disability Affect Retirement Benefits?

How Does Social Security Disability Affect Retirement Benefits?

Whether retirement is only a few years away or you’re a younger disabled worker planning for the future, understanding the impacts of receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is important. Find out what you need to know about disability and retirement, plus tips for managing your benefits, from the Social Security disability lawyers at SSDA USA.

What’s The Difference Between Disability and Retirement?

First up, let’s talk about the difference between disability and retirement benefits. Both are administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA), and both are programs designed to provide financial assistance to Americans who can no longer work. Both programs also have specific requirements beneficiaries must meet in order to qualify for benefits.

Qualifying for Disability Benefits

disability or retirement

SSDI benefits are awarded to people whose medical condition meets the SSA’s definition of a disability—that is, a physical or mental health condition that prevents someone from working and engaging in Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA). In addition, the qualifying condition must have lasted or be expected to last for at least one (1) year (or alternatively, to result in that person’s death).

Unlike other Social Security programs such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI), qualifying for disability also requires that you have earned enough work credits. SSDI is funded by Social Security payroll taxes, so in order to be considered insured, you must have worked long enough, recently enough, and you must have paid Social Security taxes on your earnings. Once you qualify for disability, your benefits will continue unless your disability improves or until you reach retirement age.

Qualifying for Retirement Benefits

Retirement benefits, like SSI and SSDI, are a type of monthly payment paid to eligible Americans by the SSA. Once you have amassed enough work credits, paid into Social Security through federal taxes, and reached age 62, you can begin collecting retirement benefits. The amount of your monthly benefit depends on how much you worked, how much money you made, and whether you decide to keep working past the age of 62.

If you wait until your full retirement age (for those born after 1960, age 67), your monthly benefit will increase. And, if you are able to and decide to keep working until you are 70 years old, you can maximize your monthly retirement benefits. Once you begin receiving retirement benefits, you will continue to receive them for the rest of your life.

Can I Receive Social Security Disability AND Retirement Benefits?

In most cases, you cannot receive Social Security disability and retirement benefits at the same time, since SSDI benefits are meant for those who cannot work due to injury or illness. If you’re receiving retirement benefits, it is already implicit that you are no longer working. There is one exception to this rule, however. 

If you take an early retirement at age 62 before applying for disability benefits, and are later found to have been eligible for disability during that time, the Social Security Administration will make up the difference between your early retirement benefits and your monthly disability benefits for those months that you received early retirement payments. Of course, you’ll have to submit adequate documentation that you took an early retirement because of your disabling condition.

It’s also worth noting that some individuals can draw monthly benefits from more than one Social Security program. For example, you may be able to qualify for both SSI and SSDI or retirement and SSI.

Is it Better to Retire Early or Go on Disability?

disability and retirement

If you are approaching early retirement age and also have become disabled, you may be unsure whether you should take an early retirement or apply for disability until you reach full retirement age. 

On the one hand, if you already know you have enough work credits to retire, the processing of starting your retirement benefits will be a lot easier than going through the laborious process of applying for disability. 

On the other hand, you may not want to sacrifice the extra monthly benefits (as much as 30% more) you could get if you waited until full retirement or age 70 to begin collecting benefits. If you’re not too concerned about your financial stability, opting for early retirement might not seem like a big deal, especially if you have a pension through your employer or other types of retirement accounts like an IRA or 401K.

However, if you’re like many Americans, you may need all the help you can get from the Social Security Administration. In this case, it’s most likely better to get approved for disability benefits rather than take an early retirement and lose out on your hard-earned benefits. While it can be true that getting approved for SSDI can take time, effort, and patience, disability benefits can offer you a kind of flexibility that retirement can’t—especially if there’s a chance of your disability improving.

What Happens To My Disability Benefits When I Reach Retirement Age?

Once you successfully get approved for disability benefits, your monthly benefits should stay the same unless your disability improves, you start engaging in Substantial Gainful Employment (SGA), or you have a spouse whose income surpasses SSDI threshold levels. You can even continue to work part-time on disability or try out other options like a trial work period to see if you’re able to fully transition back into the workforce.

Making the switch from receiving disability payments to retirement benefits is simple—because for most beneficiaries, their monthly benefit stays exactly the same. This is because the SSA calculates your SSDI benefits as though you have already reached full retirement age, which is equal to 100% of your maximum benefit based on your lifetime earnings.

Get Help Qualifying for Disability Benefits

The truth is, applying for disability can be a long and sometimes frustrating process. Most first-time applicants are denied, and appeals can take months. However, this doesn’t mean you should give up hope. With the help of an experienced Social Security disability lawyer, you can increase your odds of being approved the first time and strengthen your claim should you need to go through the appeals process.

To find out the difference having dedicated representation on your side can make, contact us at Social Security Disability Advocates USA today. We’ll arrange a free, no obligation consultation with our legal team to review your disability claim and help you make the right decision for you and your family. Get in touch 24/7 by calling 602-952-3200, connecting with one of our LiveChat agents, or by filling out this form to request your complimentary case review.

This is attorney advertising. SSDA, LLC is a group of attorneys that pursues claims for Social Security Disability benefits on behalf of its clients against the Social Security Administration. SSDA, LLC is in no way a part of the Social Security Administration. Further, the information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, a representative-client relationship.
What Mental Disorders Qualify for Social Security Disability?

What Mental Disorders Qualify for Social Security Disability?

disability for mental health conditions

Every year, millions of people apply for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), a program that provides monthly benefits to disabled beneficiaries and their families. If you or a loved one is suffering from a mental disorder that keeps you from working, you may be wondering if the Social Security Administration (SSA) will consider your mental disorder a disability or not. While not everyone who applies will qualify for SSDI benefits, many people diagnosed with mental health disorders may be eligible. 

If you’re thinking of applying for disability benefits, the SSA blue book is a good place to start. In it, you’ll find listings of impairments which may meet the requirements for SSDI. It’s important to note, however, that whether or not you’ll be approved also hinges on other factors, including your work history, the severity of your condition(s), your age, education, and work skills. That being said, receiving disability for mental disorders isn’t uncommon—according to the SSA Annual Statistical Report, about 18.3% of all approved cases in 2019 were for mental disorders.

Qualifying Mental Disorders for Disability

In the blue book, mental disorders as defined by the SSA are broken up into 11 general categories, many of which contain subcategories of multiple known conditions and diagnoses.

Neurocognitive Disorders

Neurocognitive disorders are defined as a disability that results due to a clinically significant decline in cognitive functioning. Common neurocognitive disorders include Alzheimer’s dementia, vascular dementia, disease-related dementia, HIV-associated cognitive disorder, progressive brain tumors, and neurological diseases like Parkinson’s and Huntington’s Disease. Traumatic brain injuries and substance-induced cognitive disorders may also sometimes be evaluated as a neurocognitive disorder (other times they may be considered a neurological disorder).

Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders

Those diagnosed on the schizophrenia spectrum or with other psychotic disorders may be considered disabled by the SSA if associated symptoms cause a clinically significant decline in cognitive or overall functioning. Common diagnoses and conditions include schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, delusional disorder, or psychotic disorders caused by another condition.

Depressive, Bipolar, and Related Disorders

disability for mental disorders

Mental disorders which cause significantly debilitating irritability, depression, sleep disturbances, suicidal ideation, trouble concentrating, grandiosity, or psychomotor abnormalities may be evaluated as a disabling condition by the SSA. Commonly included disorders include bipolar I or II, major depressive disorder, persistent depressive disorder (also known as dysthymia), cyclothymic disorder, or depressive disorders caused by another condition.

Intellectual Disorders

Intellectual disorders are defined as those which result in intellectual levels significantly below average, along with low adaptive functioning that manifests before the age of 22. No specific disorders are listed in the blue book, and qualifying conditions are listed only as “intellectual disabilities or intellectual developmental disorders”.

Anxiety and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders

The SSA classes these disorders as those which result in excessive worrying and avoidance of things, places, or people who trigger their anxiety. Relevant disorders include agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder

Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders

Somatic symptom disorder and other related disorders refer to sometimes non-specific mental disorders attributed to physical symptoms which are not fully explainable by any other mental health condition, physical condition, substance use, or culturally-sanctioned behavior. This does not include any illnesses which are feigned or intentionally produced (i.e., a factitious disorder). Sufferers may have been diagnosed with somatic symptom disorder, illness anxiety disorder, or conversion disorder.

Personality and Impulse-Control Disorders

Personality disorders are generally defined by maladaptive behavior patterns that often emerge in young adulthood and persist indefinitely. Those who have been diagnosed with avoidant personality disorder, borderline personality disorder, dependent personality disorder, intermittent explosive disorder, paranoid personality disorder, schizoid personality disorder, or schizotypal personality disorder may qualify under this listing. Obsessive-compulsive disorder may also be evaluated as an impulse-control disorder.

Autism Spectrum Disorder

Autism spectrum disorder here refers to both those diagnosed with autism with or without intellectual or language impairment. Qualitative deficits can be observed in social development, verbal and nonverbal communication skills, symbolic activity, and/or restricted and repetitive behavior patterns or interests. Behavioral difficulties, stagnation of development, and skill loss early in life may also be observed.

Neurodevelopmental Disorders

disability for mental disorders

Neurodevelopmental disorders are classed as those that occur during the developmental years in childhood or adolescence. Some of these types of disorders may not be diagnosed until adulthood. Differences in cognitive processing, issues with impulse control, motor skills, and low organization skills may be present. Applicable disorders include specific learning disorders, borderline intellectual functioning, and tic disorders (i.e., Tourette’s syndrome). 

Eating Disorders

Disability for mental disorders may also include those with eating disorders characterized by significant disturbances in eating behaviors along with excessive worry or preoccupation with body weight, shape, or size. Qualifying disorders may include anorexia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, and avoidant/restrictive food disorder.

Trauma and Stressor-Related Disorders

Trauma and stressor-related disorders often stems from having experienced or witnessed a traumatic or extremely stressful event. The symptoms of such disorders must significantly impair functioning. This category includes post-traumatic stress disorder, other specific stressor-related disorders, and some persistent adjustment disorders.

How To Get Disability For Mental Disorders

Before beginning the disability application process, it’s important that you understand how long it will take, the extent of medical documentation you’ll need, and how the Social Security Administration will evaluate your disability claim. Remember, simply having the symptoms or having been diagnosed with a mental health condition is not enough on its own to qualify you for benefits. 

The truth is, applying for disability for a mental health disorder can be a long and at times frustrating process. Most first-time applicants are denied, and appeals can take months. However, this doesn’t mean you should give up hope. With the help of an experienced Social Security disability lawyer, you can increase your odds of being approved the first time and strengthen your claim should you need to go through the appeals process.

To find out the difference having dedicated representation on your side can make, contact us at Social Security Disability Advocates USA today. We’ll arrange a free, no obligation consultation with our legal team to review your disability claim and help you make the right decision for you and your family. Get in touch 24/7 by calling 602-952-3200, connecting with one of our LiveChat agents, or by filling out this form to request your complimentary case review.

This is attorney advertising. SSDA, LLC is a group of attorneys that pursues claims for Social Security Disability benefits on behalf of its clients against the Social Security Administration. SSDA, LLC is in no way a part of the Social Security Administration. Further, the information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, a representative-client relationship.