blog

FAQ About Disability Benefits and Unemployment

FAQ About Disability Benefits and Unemployment

When it comes to disability benefits and unemployment, these two kinds of payments may seem inherently at odds with each other. After all, to qualify for disability payments, you must have a demonstrated condition that prevents you from working. At the same time, in order to obtain unemployment, you must generally meet the condition of being actively engaged in seeking full-time work.

disability benefits and unemployment

In many situations, you won’t be able to qualify for both disability payments and unemployment benefits at the same time. But there are specific circumstances under which beneficiaries may be entitled to both—and that can mean the difference between staying afloat or continuing to struggle in these tough economic times. Read on to find out if you may be eligible for one or both of these forms of aid with the help of a Social Security disability lawyer.

Does Disability Pay the Same as Unemployment?    

In short, no. The amount of disability benefits or unemployment an individual receives is based on too many factors, including the state you live in, your age, work history, etc. It’s important to note that due to the COVID-19 pandemic, unemployment benefits have been extended and supplemented by the federal government via temporary programs including Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), and Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA).   

How Much Does Unemployment Pay?

Most states offer about 26 weeks’ worth of unemployment benefits, but how your benefits are calculated varies. In Massachusetts, for example, unemployment benefits are 1/2 of your average weekly earnings. Your weekly unemployment benefits could range from a minimum of $98 to a maximum of $1,234.

In other states, however, unemployment is not so generous. In Mississippi, recipients will get between just $30 and $235 per week, or 1/26 of their earnings in the highest quarter of your base period (the first four of the last five calendar quarters prior to your claim). In most states, the range is somewhere between $300 to $500 per week. To really get an idea of how much you could get on unemployment (and in conjunction with the recent extension of federal pandemic unemployment assistance), you’ll need to contact your local unemployment office.

How Much Does Disability Pay?

In order to receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) payments, you’ll have to meet two major requirements. Firstly, you must have a qualifying medical condition which prevents you from working. Secondly, you must have earned enough work credits. (If you are disabled but do not have enough work credits, you may still qualify for financial assistance through the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program.)

SSDI benefits are dependent upon your lifetime average earnings (a portion of which you paid into Social Security). As such, having access to your full work history becomes extremely important when estimating what your benefit amount could be. 

Going into 2021, the average disabled worker will receive $1,277 per month in disability benefits. The maximum monthly payment a disabled worker can receive in 2021 is $3,011. In other words, disability benefits provide steady (although not exorbitant) income for workers who are truly disabled and who are unlikely to be able to return to work. 

Learn more about how Social Security disability benefit amounts are calculated.

Can I Get Unemployment While I’m Waiting For Disability?

Trying to make ends meet when you’re disabled can be very difficult. And because qualifying for benefits can sometimes take months or even years, many people are concerned about how they’ll continue to pay their bills while waiting for a decision from the Social Security Administration (SSA). 

Unfortunately, the SSA does not automatically provide applicants any intermediary financial aid while waiting for disability. Exceptions to this rule include serious conditions that qualify for compassionate allowance or expedited reinstatement for those who have lost their benefits but qualified in the past.

disability benefits and unemployment

If you lost your job because of your disability—that is, you missed too many shifts because of doctor’s appointments or could no longer perform the job’s essential duties—you could potentially qualify for unemployment benefits. That being said, collecting unemployment may be a bad look for your disability claim. 

Unemployment benefits are designed for temporarily laid-off workers who are both ready and willing to work. Disability benefits are for permanently disabled workers who are unable to work or engage in any kind of Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA). As of 2021, SGA refers to monthly income in excess of $1,310 for non-blind disabled individuals. 

Should you bring your claim to a disability hearing in the future, an administrative law judge could doubt the legitimacy of your inability to work based on the fact that you collected unemployment. Bottom line: it is highly recommended to consult with an experienced attorney before applying for disability benefits and unemployment.

SSDI applicants who need interim financial assistance may find it helpful to reach out to their state’s Department of Social Services. Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP), and your local Department of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) may be able to help.

Can I Collect Disability Benefits and Unemployment At the Same Time?

Although disability benefits and unemployment payments don’t mix much of the time, there are some circumstances in which an individual receiving disability benefits could also be entitled to unemployment. If you are working part-time on disability (while earning less than current SGA thresholds) and you are laid off from your job, you may be able to collect both your SSDI benefits and unemployment at the same time. 

The same may be true if you are in a trial work period as a part of the SSA’s Ticket to Work Program and are laid off. Keep in mind, however, that requirements and restrictions on how much you can receive from your state’s unemployment office in addition to disability payments may vary considerably depending on where you live and work. In states such as Wisconsin and North Carolina, SSDI recipients are regularly disqualified from receiving regular unemployment insurance. Luckily, lawmakers changed course when it came to allowing SSDI beneficiaries to apply for PUA. 

Who Can Help Me With Disability Benefits and Unemployment?

If you still have questions about disability benefits and unemployment, the best course of action is to talk to a qualified professional. Many state agencies have been overwhelmed by inquiries and applications during the coronavirus pandemic. For knowledgeable and personalized assistance, contact a Social Security disability attorney at Social Security Disability Advocates USA.

Our law firm offers free, no obligation consultations for those who need help applying for benefits or appealing a decision. Call us today at 602-952-3200, connect with one of our LiveChat agents, or simply fill out this form to request your free case review.

This is attorney advertising. SSDA, LLC is a group of attorneys that pursues claims for Social Security Disability benefits on behalf of its clients against the Social Security Administration. SSDA, LLC is in no way a part of the Social Security Administration. Further, the information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, a representative-client relationship.
How to Check Your Social Security Disability Claim Status

How to Check Your Social Security Disability Claim Status

The Social Security disability application process can seem to go on forever when you’re awaiting a decision. In addition, trying to track down your Social Security disability claim status can be downright confusing if you don’t know where to look. Find out how to check on an SSDI claim application status at every step of the process with this guide from Social Security Disability Advocates USA. 

Checking Your Application Status After Applying for SSDI

Social Security disability claim status

If this is your first time applying for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits, you may be wondering how long it will take the Social Security Administration (SSA) to receive, process, and make a decision on your application. 

According to the SSA, it can take from 30 days to 90 days to come to a decision on an initial application. However, it’s worth noting that it’s not uncommon for this process to take as long as six months. This can happen if your case needs additional verification, has errors, or if there’s a large backlog of applications when you apply.  Note: if your condition is severe enough, you may qualify for compassionate allowance, which will expedite this process.

When you first submit your SSDI application either online, by phone, or in person, the application will be forwarded to Disability Determination Services (DDS), which are federally-funded, state-run agencies. DDS will assign a claims examiner to your case. Following the receipt of your application, you or your attorney will receive a phone call and additional paperwork to complete. This will let you know that the process is moving forward.

When to Start Checking Your SSDI Application Status

It’s good practice to begin periodically checking on the status of your disability claim approximately a month after submitting it. Doing so will make sure you know as soon as possible if the approval process has stalled for any reason, like needing additional medical documentation of your condition. The sooner you address potential issues, the more quickly and efficiently your application will be processed. There are multiple ways to check your SSDI application status, whether you’re computer savvy or not.

Check the Status of Your SSDI Claim Online

check status of ssdi claim online

The fastest and easiest way to check your Social Security disability claim status is to log in to your my Social Security account. Even if you didn’t complete the application process online, you can still create a my Social Security account after the fact in order to view the current status of your claim. 

To create an account, you’ll need to provide a valid email address, your Social Security number, and a U.S. mailing address. You must also be at least 18 years old.  Here is the step-by-step process to accessing your claim status using your my Social Security account.

  1. After you log in, navigate to the My Home page. 
  2. Scroll down to the section called Your Benefit Applications.
  3. Select View More under the heading called More Info.
  4. You’ll be able to see the status of your application under the Current Status section.

Your my Social Security account will show pertinent information about your case, including your re-entry number (if you started an application online but have not yet finished it), the date the SSA received your application or subsequent appeals, scheduled hearing dates and times, the name and location of the field office processing your application or appeal, and whether or not a decision has been made in your case.

Call Your Local SSA Field Office

Although the COVID-19 pandemic prompted many SSA office closures, you may still be able to reach a representative from your local field office by phone. If you know the name of the disability examiner assigned to your case, you may also be able to contact them directly.

Call the Social Security Administration For Status Updates

If you are unable to check your disability claim status online or by contacting your local field office, you can contact the SSA directly by phone. Hint: to avoid longer wait times, try the automated telephone services first.

  • Automated Telephone Service:1-800-772-1213
    Call this toll-free number to find out your disability claim status 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
  • Social Security Representative: 1-800-772-1213*
    Representatives are available Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. local time.
  • TTY for the Deaf or Hard of Hearing: 1-800-325-0778
    Representatives are available Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. local time.
  • For Those Living Outside the U.S.: 410-965-0160
    English-speaking representatives are available between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Eastern time.

*You must go through the automated telephone service before speaking to a live agent. To speak to a Social Security representative, say “disability” when the operator asks why you are calling. When the operator asks what information you are looking for about disability, say “Something else” to be rerouted to a live agent.

Still need help? The SSA provides special assistance and notifications for those who are blind, visually impaired, deaf, or hard of hearing. They also provide free interpreter services. Click here for details.

Talk To Your Social Security Disability Lawyer

If you are working with an experienced Social Security disability attorney, you can expect to be kept in the loop by your legal counsel, who will be paying close attention to any and all developments in your disability claim. If you’re not sure whether or not you need a lawyer, you can arrange a legal consultation regarding your case at no cost by choosing one of the options below.

Checking Your Claim Status After Requesting a Reconsideration

how to check on ssdi application status

More often than not, first time SSDI applicants are denied for a myriad of reasons. If this happens to you, don’t give up. You’ll have 60 days following the receipt of your denial letter to file a request for reconsideration. Again, this can be a lengthy process, one which you’ll want to check in on regularly.

 To check the status of your disability claim after requesting a reconsideration, talk to your lawyer, call your local SSA field office, or contact your new DDS claims examiner. You can also check your claim status by logging into your my Social Security account online.

Checking Your Disability Appeal Status After Requesting a Hearing

If your claim is denied after requesting a reconsideration, you can then appeal an SSA decision. Once you’ve requested a hearing with an administrative law judge (ALJ), you’ll wait to receive a notice of the date, time, and place of your disability hearing

You’ll be notified of this appeal information in writing via U.S. mail, but you can also access this information online by logging in to your my Social Security account. If you have additional questions, you can contact the SSA’s Office of Disability Adjudication and Review (ODAR). Utilize the contact information sent directly to you in your hearing notice.

Checking Your Disability Claim Status After Requesting an Appeals Council Review

how to check disability appeal status

If an administrative law judge denies your claim, you can still request an Appeals Council Review. At this point, it is strongly recommended to retain the services of a Social Security disability lawyer for the best case results. Your legal counsel will keep you up to date on the status of your claim if you get to this point in the appeals process. 

Still, you can be proactive and verify that the Appeals Council has received your request for review by calling the SSA Claimant and Public Assistance Branch at 703-605-8000 or toll-free at 1-877-670-2722.

Checking Your Case Status After Filing a Federal Court Appeal

If all else fails, you can file a civil lawsuit against the Social Security Administration. For this last step of the appeals process, your attorney or legal team will be with you every step of the way to keep you informed about the status of your case.

How Working With An Attorney Can Help Your Case

Whether you’re applying for disability for the first time or appealing a denial, a trained Social Security disability lawyer can not only help you qualify for benefits, but also ensure that you receive the maximum disability benefits amounts based on your eligibility.

To find out more, contact Social Security Disability Advocates USA by calling 602-952-3200. Representatives are standing by 24/7 via LiveChat to answer any questions you may have. You can also request you free, no obligation consultation right now by completing this convenient form

This is attorney advertising. SSDA, LLC is a group of attorneys that pursues claims for Social Security Disability benefits on behalf of its clients against the Social Security Administration. SSDA, LLC is in no way a part of the Social Security Administration. Further, the information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, a representative-client relationship.
Your Guide to Social Security Disability Back Pay

Your Guide to Social Security Disability Back Pay

social security disability back pay

Many Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) applicants are discouraged when they find out there’s often a significant waiting period before you can start receiving benefits. While this delay of funds can make staying afloat financially more difficult in the meantime, there is a silver lining to look forward to—Social Security Disability back pay

What Is Social Security Disability Back Pay?

By the time you are approved, months or even years may have passed since you first began the Social Security Disability application process. In many cases, the Social Security Administration (SSA) will issue you payments for the monthly benefits you would have received while your application was under review. This is often referred to as SSDI back pay.

Does Everyone Get Back Pay for Disability?

The vast majority of applicants who are approved for SSDI benefits will receive back pay for the period of time between the day they applied and when their application is accepted. How much back pay you will receive depends on how long it took you to be approved. Since many first-time disability applicants are denied and must go through the SSDI appeals process, this amount can add up over time.

The only exception to this is those who get approved for disability benefits quickly. Often these are people with the most severe conditions, including those disabilities who qualify for compassionate allowance and people with terminal illnesses. Because many of these applicants are approved in as little as two months from the time of application—and because the SSA has a mandated five-month waiting period before you can qualify for benefits—these SSDI recipients likely won’t receive any back pay.

How Is SSDI Back Pay Calculated?

The amount of back pay you receive may vary considerably depending on the length of time it took you to get approved and your determined disability benefits amount. If you’ve already found out how much your monthly benefit will be, you can easily calculate how much back pay you’ll receive by multiplying your monthly payment by the number of months between applying for benefits and when you were approved (minus, of course, the standard five-month waiting period). 

For example, let’s say you initially applied for SSDI benefits in January of 2019 and were denied (like most first-time applicants). Let’s say it took five months for you to receive the denial. In June 2019, you requested a reconsideration review. This took another three months, putting you in September 2019. 

Your reconsideration review was also denied (again, a very common occurrence), so you requested a disability hearing. You waited a whole year before you got the chance to present your case to a disability judge in September 2020. Within two months of that hearing, you finally got approved for SSDI benefits in November 2020. Your monthly benefit is determined to be $1,000. 

At this point, it’s been 22 months since you applied for benefits. After subtracting the five-month waiting period, you are left with 17 months during which you did not receive benefits. As such, you would be entitled to $17,000 in disability back pay.

Is There a Limit on Social Security Disability Back Pay?

There’s no real limit on how much SSDI back pay you can receive. If it took three years from the time you applied to the time you were finally approved for benefits, you could receive all but five months of back pay accrued during those 36 months. It all depends on how long your case takes to approve.

When it comes to retroactive pay, on the other hand, there are limits to how much the SSA will pay out. Retroactive pay refers to monthly benefits you may have been entitled to based on your disability onset date. In most cases, the SSA will assume that your disability began the day you applied for benefits. With the help of a qualified Social Security Disability lawyer, you may be able to successfully argue for an earlier disability onset date. If you are able to do this, you can receive retroactive benefits up to 17 months prior to your application date. Unlike back pay, retroactive benefits are limited to 17 months regardless of whether you’ve been disabled prior to that time.

Need help covering your bills while your SSDI application is processed? Find out if you qualify for financial aid while waiting for disability.

When And How Will I Receive My SSDI Back Pay?

SSDI back pay is usually paid in a lump sum unless you are also receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), in which case you’ll receive both SSI and SSDI benefits in three installments. When you’ll receive your back pay lump sum is a bit less certain. Some beneficiaries report receiving their back pay before they’ve even been notified that they have been approved for SSDI benefits. 

Others may not see back pay deposited into their account until a few weeks or months after they begin receiving their regular monthly benefits. You should receive a Social Security Disability award letter containing your benefit amount, regular payment dates going forward, how much you’re owed in back pay, and a rough timeline of when to expect your lump sum.

Is Social Security Disability Back Pay Taxable?

Most states do not tax SSDI benefits or Social Security Disability back pay. However, some states may require you to pay taxes on them. See how SSDI back pay and other SSDI benefits are taxed in the exceptional states listed below.

  • Montana imposes its full income taxes on SSDI benefits and back pay at their state income tax rate.
  • New Mexico imposes full income taxes on SSDI benefits and back pay, with exemptions for low-income individuals and those over the age of 65.
  • Utah imposes full income taxes on SSDI benefits and back pay, but does offer tax credits depending on your age and household income.
  • Connecticut, Colorado, Kansas, and Missouri tax SSDI benefits and back pay based on your adjusted gross income (AGI).
  • Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Vermont, and West Virginia tax SSDI benefits and back pay at the federal rate, but many offer tax credits or income deductions.

Get Help Getting the SSDI Back Pay You Deserve

Applying for disability benefits can be confusing, time-consuming, and frustrating. To get help with applying, appealing a decision, or just to talk about all your SSDI legal options, contact Social Security Disability Advocates USA. 

We’ll schedule a free consultation to review your case and help you navigate locating financial aid while waiting for disability. Call us today at 602-952-3200, chat with us via LiveChat, or send us a message using our secure contact form

This is attorney advertising. SSDA, LLC is a group of attorneys that pursues claims for Social Security Disability benefits on behalf of its clients against the Social Security Administration. SSDA, LLC is in no way a part of the Social Security Administration. Further, the information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, a representative-client relationship.
What You Need to Know About Medicare and SSDI Benefits

What You Need to Know About Medicare and SSDI Benefits

SSDI and Medicare

Medicare Open Enrollment is October 15 – December 7, 2020. If you are applying for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits and are wondering when your new health insurance will kick in, now is the best time to learn how Medicare works, who it benefits, and how Medicare and SSDI benefits can work together. Social Security Disability Advocates USA explains what beneficiaries need to know about getting the most out of their disability benefits and healthcare coverage.

What Is Medicare? Who Qualifies For It?

Before we delve into the intricacies of SSDI and Medicare, let’s take a moment to go over what Medicare is and who benefits from it. Medicare is a federal insurance program established in 1965 that is designed to provide health coverage for the following individuals:

  • People who are 65 years old or older
  • Persons with qualifying disabilities who are under the age of 65
  • People diagnosed with end-stage renal disease

Medicare is split into four parts: 

  • Medicare Part A is hospital insurance that covers any inpatient hospital stays, skilled nursing facility stays, and some types of home healthcare.
  • Medicare Part B is medical insurance that covers preventative care, routine doctors’ visits, outpatient appointments, and medical supplies.
  • Medicare Part D is prescription drug coverage that helps beneficiaries pay for the cost of their prescribed medications, shots, and vaccines.
  • Medicare Part C is private health insurance (also called a Medicare Advantage Plan) that has been approved and partially paid for by Medicare. This includes HMOs and PPOs. Medicare Part C often combines Medicare Parts A, B, and D, plus extra coverage options like dental, vision, and hearing.

Is Medicare Free If You Are Disabled?

The cost of Medicare depends on several factors and varies from Part A, B, C, and D. In most cases, as long as you or a spouse has paid sufficient Medicare taxes and amassed enough work credits*, Medicare Part A will be free of cost to you, if you are under the age of 65 and have a disability. This is often referred to as “premium-free” Part A. 

*If you do not have enough work credits to qualify for SSDI benefits and are under age 65, you may still qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Medicaid.

While Part A Is Usually Free, Part B Requires a Monthly Premium

For Medicare Part B, you’ll likely pay a monthly premium. If you receive Social Security benefits of any kind, your Medicare Part B premium will be automatically deducted from your monthly benefit amount. 

Just how much will your monthly premium be? The standard monthly cost of Medicare Part B in 2020 is $144.60. In 2021, that cost will rise slightly to $148.50 per month. If, however, you earned more than $87,000 two years prior to enrolling ($174,000 for tax returns filed jointly), you will pay an additional fee for Part B called Income Related Monthly Adjustment Amount (IRMAA). In addition to monthly premiums, you’ll also be subject to variable deductible and coinsurance costs.

Part D Premiums Are Determined by Private Health Insurance

Similar to Medicare Part C, Medicare Part D is administered by private health insurance companies that are approved and partially funded by Medicare. As a result, how much you’ll pay for your premium, deductible, and other costs will vary depending on the Medicare drug plan you select. 

That being said, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) announced that the  national average monthly cost for 2021 will be $43.07. This is in addition to your deductible costs and any coinsurance included in your plan.

How Long Do I Have To Be On SSDI Before I Get Medicare?

SSDI and Medicare often go hand in hand, but unfortunately there is a waiting period before you can start receiving both Medicare and SSDI benefits. Once you begin receiving monthly SSDI benefits, you must wait 24 months before qualifying for Medicare. Considering how long it often takes just to qualify for and begin receiving disability benefits, this can leave some disabled workers with no healthcare and little to no income.

Although the Social Security Administration does not automatically offer any interim financial aid while waiting for disability, other resources may be available to help you stay afloat until your SSDI and Medicare benefits go into effect. 

Contact your local Department of Social Services or Department of Health and Social Services to find out what kind of interim assistance may be available to you, including programs like Medicaid, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

In some cases during your Medicare waiting period, you may be eligible for healthcare coverage through a former employer. If you are able to work in some capacity, you can also qualify for a trial work period which won’t affect your benefits as long as you earn less than what is considered Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA).

Where Can I Get Help Applying for SSDI Benefits and Medicare?

Filing for disability benefits can be a frustrating, drawn-out process—but it doesn’t have to be. With proficient legal counsel at your side, you can ensure that you get the maximum disability benefits amount and minimize the amount of time spent waiting for Medicare eligibility. Whether you’re considering applying or dealing with the frustration of a denied claim, a Social Security disability attorney can help.

At Social Security Disability Advocates USA, we offer free consultations to all disability claimants. We believe that everyone should be aware of all their legal options before hiring a lawyer. To get in touch with our team and claim your complimentary no obligation review, call us at 602-952-3200. We also have LiveChat agents standing by to answer your questions, or you can go ahead and request your free case review using this form.

This is attorney advertising. SSDA, LLC is a group of attorneys that pursues claims for Social Security Disability benefits on behalf of its clients against the Social Security Administration. SSDA, LLC is in no way a part of the Social Security Administration. Further, the information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, a representative-client relationship.
Will Social Security Disability Increase in 2021?

Will Social Security Disability Increase in 2021?

2021 SSDI COLA increase

The Social Security Administration recently announced a 1.3% benefit increase for Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients beginning in January 2021. The annual cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) reflects an overall increase in the Consumer Price Index, which is calculated yearly by the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Find out everything you need to know about the 2021 SSDI COLA increase and how it may affect your finances next year with this rundown from Social Security DIsability Advocates USA.

Who Is Eligible for the 2021 COLA Benefits Increase?

Cost-of-living adjustment benefit increases will be made available to the following beneficiaries beginning in January 2021:

This includes all retired workers, widows and widowers, and disabled workers, plus their spouse and children.

How Much of An Increase Is 1.3%, Anyway?

Compared to the past two years, the 2021 SSDI COLA increase is on the low end, but it still beats out other years in which many people faced economic hardship, such as 2010, 2011, and 2016, when there was no COLA increase at all.

From month to month, you may not notice a huge jump in your disability benefits amount. For example, the average disabled worker received a monthly payment of $1,261 in 2020. In January 2021, the same worker can expect their monthly benefits to increase to $1,277. This provides the average disabled beneficiary with an additional $192 per year.

On the other hand, the maximum monthly benefit for disabled workers in 2020 is $3,011. These beneficiaries will receive a slightly more substantial addition of $469 per year, or an extra $39 per month, with a total of around $3,480 in annual benefits in 2021.

What Other Changes Are Coming to the SSA in 2021?

The 2021 SSDI COLA increase isn’t the only thing changing in the Social Security Administration in 2021.

Maximum Earnings Subject to Social Security Tax

Beginning in January 2021, the maximum amount of annual earnings subject to Social Security taxation will increase from $137,700 to $142,800. This is based on an overall increase in average wages. If you are still working and earned more than the maximum in any year, the SSA will only take into consideration the maximum taxable earnings figure to determine your benefits. 

Trial Work Periods

In 2020, disabled individuals were allowed to earn up to $910 a month during a trial work period. In 2021, this amount will increase to $940 a month. Earnings of more than $940 a month may be considered substantial gainful activity (SGA), so those who are working part-time on disability should be aware of this change.

How Can I Maximize My Monthly SSDI Benefits?

If you’re thinking about applying for disability benefits or need information about the SSDI appeal process during the coronavirus pandemic, legal help is available to assist you in getting the maximum possible monthly benefit for you and your family.

Contact our Social Security disability lawyers by calling 602-952-3200. We’ll schedule a free consultation to help you navigate the process of filing for disability and what to do if your claim is denied. Have questions? Representatives are standing by via LiveChat to answer them. You can also request your free case review by filling out this simple form.

This is attorney advertising. SSDA, LLC is a group of attorneys that pursues claims for Social Security Disability benefits on behalf of its clients against the Social Security Administration. SSDA, LLC is in no way a part of the Social Security Administration. Further, the information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, a representative-client relationship.