How Severe Does My Vision Loss Have to Be to Get Disability Benefits?

How Severe Does My Vision Loss Have to Be to Get Disability Benefits?

Social Security Benefits for Vision Loss Vision loss is not an uncommon condition. Most people start losing some of their vision as they age. Many people require glasses or contacts even at an early age. In fact, according to the 2015 National Health Interview Survey, roughly 23.7 million Americans 18 years or older reported that they had experienced some kind of vision loss. While vision loss isn’t uncommon, severe vision loss can affect your ability to work. It  as well as to perform normal activities of daily living. In such a case, you may be eligible to collect Social Security benefits for vision loss.

The Cost of Visions Loss

There are few jobs that don’t require a person to have good vision to perform. This means that if you lose your vision to the extent that you are legally blind, you may no longer be able to perform your job effectively or safely. Besides losing out on this income, there are a number of costs associated with vision loss when it comes to the activities of daily living.

For example, you may need to make modifications to your home to make it safer for you to live in. This can be quite expensive. You may also be required to take different modes of transportation, which can also add up. You might want to get a service animal as well. Unfortunately, the cost of raising and training just a single service animal is around $50,000 according to the Guide Dog Foundation.

Not to mention that you will also incur the costs of any medical procedures you have done in an attempt to correct your vision loss. Fortunately, a lot of these costs could be covered by Social Security if you are able to qualify.

Social Security Benefits for Vision Loss

Because the extent of vision loss a person can experience can vary greatly, the Social Security Administration will look at a number of different factors to determine if you qualify for Social Security disability benefits. First of all, if you are considered legally blind in both eyes, then you should have no problem qualifying.

In order to qualify without being legally blind in both eyes, the Social Security Administration will require that you meet one of three main criteria. These criteria focus on the better of your two eyes. They do this in order to determine exactly how disabling your vision loss is.

Criteria for Vision Loss

These criteria include:

  • The loss in your central field of vision – You cannot see better than 20/200 in your better eye to qualify.
  • A shrinking field of vision – If you can prove that your visual field is narrow, then you may qualify. To prove this, you will need to take several vision tests that will measure your field of vision. The doctor will need to record what you can see when you’re focusing on a specific point. The diameter of what you can see around that point should be around 30 degrees or less.
  • Visual impairments – If you have issues that cause unfocused or blurry vision, or a lack of vision, you may qualify. You must have 20/200 vision or worse in your better eye (while wearing corrective lenses) to meet the definition of having a visual impairment.

The loss of vision can greatly affect your ability to work and to perform day-to-day tasks. Fortunately, you could qualify for Social Security benefits for vision loss. Find out how you can apply for Social Security disability benefits for your vision loss by calling Social Security Disability Advocates USA at (602) 952-3200 to schedule a free consultation today. We are available at your convenience 24/7.

The information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute a representative-client relationship.

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