Social Security Disability Physical Exertion Requirements

Social Security Disability Physical Exertion Requirements

Physical Exertion Requirements for SSDI

If you have experienced some sort of a condition, whether it’s an injury or disease, that is disabling, then you may be eligible for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). However, in order to qualify, you’ll need to be able to prove that you have been unable to work for 12 consecutive months. Or,  you have the expectation of not being able to wor for at least 12 months. When the Social Security Administration (SSA) reviews your case, they will evaluate your inability to work based on their disability physical exertion requirements.

What are the Disability Physical Exertion Requirements?

Essentially, in order to qualify for disability benefits, you cannot be physically able to perform your job. Or, to do a different job full time. While you’re unlikely to be able to do construction work, you might still be able to do sedentary work. For example, sitting behind a computer and inputting data. If your condition has no effect on such a job and you are qualified to find such a position of employment, then you may not be able to qualify for benefits.

Keeping that in mind, the SSA classifies jobs based on their physical requirements in the following manner:

    1. Sedentary work. This refers to work that can be done mostly while sitting down; for example, secretarial work. However, to be able to classified as being able to do sedentary work, you’ll need to be able to carry at least 10 pounds. That is in addition to being able to walk or stand for upwards of two hours a day.
    2. Light work. To be able to do light work, you will need to be able to lift upwards of 20 pounds. You will also need to be able to lift and carry upwards of 10 pounds on a regular basis. Light work may require you to spend most of the workday standing or walking.
    3. Medium work. Medium work involves being able to lift upwards of 50 pounds. And, having the ability to regularly lift and carry upwards of 25 pounds.
    4. Heavy work. Heavy work requires that you be able to lift upwards of a 100 pounds. You also have the ability to lift and carry upwards of 50 pounds frequently.
    5. Very heavy work. Very heavy work requires that you be able to lift more than 100 pounds at a time. You will also need to regularly lift and carry upwards of 50 pounds or more.

They will use these disability physical exertion requirements to determine what kind of work you were doing before your disability and what kind of work you are able to do.

How are the Disability Physical Exertion Requirements Determined?

One of the issues with the classification system is proving that your limitations keep you from doing your current job. Also, that your limitation would keep  you from doing other less demanding work. This poses a challenge for younger individuals because the SSA often decides that they can adjust for sedentary jobs. Even if they have a serious impairment.

When it comes to determining if you can or can’t adjust for a sedentary job, you will have to take an RFC (residual function capacity) assessment. It’s a thorough assessment of your impairment. The assessment determines what the most you can do is on a regular and continual basis (forty hours a week).

The majority of the information used to come to perform the evaluation will come from the symptoms described in your medical records, which is why it’s incredibly important that you provide as much medical information as you can. If it’s determined that your symptoms will prevent you from being able to even perform sedentary work, your SSDI application is likely to be approved. Some of the limitations that can prevent sedentary work can include the inability to bend down. Others include visual limitations, severe physical limitations, and more.

When applying for SSDI, it’s important to understand that you will need to meet the SSA’s disability physical exertion requirements to qualify. For SSDI advice, be sure to contact us at Social Security Disability Advocates USA for a free consultation by calling (602) 952-3200 today.

The information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute a representative-client relationship.

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