Tag: Social Security Disability

Has Your SSDI Stopped?

Has Your SSDI Stopped?

ssdi stopped
Has your SSDI stopped? Call SSDA USA today!

So, your Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) stopped. You’re probably wondering, “How could this happen?” Well, you’re not alone, and Social Security Disability Advocates USA is here to help.

There are a multitude of factors that influence your SSDI, everything from medical improvement to incarceration. It can be overwhelming to keep track of all the variables, so let us from Social Security Disability Advocates USA clarify some of the key issues surrounding your SSDI and explore some plausibilities for why your SSDI stopped.

You Went Back to Work

Going back to work is one of the most likely reasons for the reduction or cancellation of your SSDI benefits. SSDI requires that you not earn an amount equal to or above the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) limit, which in 2018 is $1,180 per month for non-blind people or $1,970 per month for blind people.

Earning the SGA or above will initiate a nine-month trial work period in which you will still receive SSDI benefits. If you continue to engage in SGA after the nine-month trial work period, you will no longer be considered disabled, and your benefits will stop.

If you are unable to work after your SSDI stopped, you don’t have to reapply for benefits all over again. You can apply for an Expedited Reinstatement (EXR) of benefits. This is so people who unsuccessfully tried to go back to work can more readily reinstate their benefits if they lost their job after their trial work period.

Be careful, though! If you are working but earning below the SGA, the Social Security Administration (SSA) may still determine that the fact you are working means you are no longer disabled. The SGA is just a definite no-go zone for people working; you can still see a reduction or a cancellation of your benefits even if you do not engage in SGA. Of course, individual cases vary, so contact SSDA USA if you have any questions about your SSDI.

You Reached Retirement Age

The SSA prevents you from receiving disability and retirement benefits concurrently. Therefore, once you reach retirement age, your SSDI benefits will stop and you will be eligible for retirement benefits. You do not have to apply for Social Security retirement benefits right away, however. Delaying your retirement benefits can be extremely beneficial for many people. Just keep in mind, though, that your SSDI will stop once you reach retirement age. You should plan ahead for this and save up as much as you can to prepare for a change in your Social Security Benefits.

You Were Incarcerated or Institutionalized

Incarceration or institutionalization can suspend your benefits until you are free again. You will see a suspension of your SSDI benefits after 30 days of incarceration unless you willingly participate in a rehabilitation program. You should see a reinstatement of your SSDI in the month following your release.

Sometimes, you will see a cancellation of your SSDI even without any incarceration. For example, a felony conviction will automatically cancel your SSDI benefits.

Your Dependent’s Benefits Stopped

If you are receiving SSDI based on someone else’s earning record, your benefits may stop if certain changes occur. For example, if you are a child receiving benefits from your parent’s SSDI, your benefits could stop when you turn 18 or get married. Dependent’s benefits are usually different from primary benefits, so different rules apply. If you are a dependent, you should always be aware of what will affect your benefits.

Your Condition Improved

So, your condition has seen a medical improvement. That’s great, right? Well, it’s tricky.

If your condition sees a “medical improvement,” as the SSA calls it, your Social Security benefits could stop. This is because if your condition sees a medical improvement, the SSA may no longer consider you disabled.

Now, what is a medical improvement? According to SSA, “Medical improvement is any decrease in the medical severity of your impairment(s) which was present at the time of the most recent favorable medical decision that you were disabled or continued to be disabled. A determination that there has been a decrease in medical severity must be based on improvement in the symptoms, signs, and/or laboratory findings associated with your impairment(s).”

Now this may sound all fancy, but it simply means this: if your condition has improved to the point that you can work or potentially earn SGA, you will no longer be considered disabled. This means that medical improvement does not necessarily mean you will no longer be considered disabled. If you can prove that you cannot work and cannot earn SGA despite your medical improvement, you will still likely receive your SSDI benefits.

Wondering Why Your SSDI Stopped?

Contact Social Security Disability Advocates today! We are professionals, and we work tirelessly to address all your concerns. Call us anytime at (602) 952-3200. Alternatively, you can contact us online or check out our LiveChat feature. Don’t let your questions bother you any longer. Contact SSDA USA today!

The information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute a representative-client relationship.

Are You Getting Enough from your Social Security Disability Insurance?

Are You Getting Enough from your Social Security Disability Insurance?

how much ssdi
Wondering how much SSDI you should be receiving? Contact SSDA USA today!

Many people receiving Social Security Disability Insurance assume they are receiving the correct amount. Usually, they are. But there are a variety of factors that can influence how much SSDI you receive.

Here’s the gist:

It’s impossible to know right off the bat how much an individual will make from their SSDI. There are many factors to consider, everything from work history to disability status. Because of this, let us from Social Security Disability Advocates USA explain some common factors that affect how much SSDI you and your family can receive.

Employment Income

To qualify for SSDI, an individual must have a condition that 1) will result in death, or 2) has lasted or will last for no less than a year, and 3) prevents them from working above the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) limit (which, in 2018, is $1,180 or $1,970 for blind people).

You must consult your total work credits and work earnings to calculate your monthly SSDI payment. For most people, 40 work credits (approximately 10 years of work) is the prerequisite for collecting SSDI benefits. Younger people do not need as many credits, however. When calculating SSDI, SSA agents use a formula on your work earnings to figure out how much SSDI you will receive monthly. Check out this SSDI calculator for more info.

If you earn a monthly amount equal to or greater than the SGA, your benefits will likely stop. Working part-time and earning below the SGA will not necessarily stop your benefits, but you could see a significant reduction.

Medical Improvement

The entire point of SSDI is to aid disabled individuals. If you see any kind of medical improvement, you could see a reduction or even a halt of your benefits. A medical improvement is any kind of improvement that would allow you to go back to the work you were doing before, or even some new kind of work.

Incarceration

Crime charges and incarceration for more than 30 days will result in the reduction or cancellation of your benefits. You will be able to reinstate your benefits once you leave, but you will not receive any Social Security benefits while you are in jail/prison.

Family Changes

Sometimes, certain arrangements in the family can reduce or cancel benefits. For example, if you are a dependent receiving SSDI based on your parent’s record, your benefits will likely end if you turn 18 or get married. If you are receiving SSDI benefits based on your own record, however, getting married will not affect your SSDI benefits. Reaching retirement age also cancels your SSDI benefits, since you cannot receive Social Security disability benefits and Social Security retirement benefits in tandem.

Still Wondering How Much SSDI You Qualify For?

If you still have questions about Social Security, Social Security Disability Advocates USA is here to help! We work tirelessly to help you with any concerns you have, so call us anytime at (602) 952-3200. Additionally, you can contact us online and utilize our LiveChat feature. Don’t wonder anymore about Social Security. Contact us today!

The information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, a representative-client relationship.

Difference Between Social Security Disability Insurance and SSI

Difference Between Social Security Disability Insurance and SSI

what is the difference between social security disability insurance and ssi
Find out more about SSI vs SSDI

When it comes to disability benefits, there are two different types of federal programs. Both federal programs provide cash payments to people who meet the federal definition of “disabled.”

  1. Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI)
  2. Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

If you are planning on applying for disability then it’s important that you understand and know the difference between SSDI vs SSI.

What is Supplemental Security Income?

SSI is a means-tested program. Stated differently, it’s a federal program that qualifies applicants based on their financial need, not off their work history. SSI generally helps individuals who are elderly, blind, or disabled. SSI can be for people who have a difficult time paying for food and shelter. You must meet the following requirements to qualify for SSI:

  • Must make less than $2,000 in assets as an individual
  • Must have less than $3,000 in assets as a couple
  • Limited income
  • Must meet the disability definition. (However, individuals over the age of 65 may qualify even if they do not meet the disability definition.)

If you do qualify for SSI benefits, then you will qualify for Medicaid benefits. Medicaid, which is a state and federal healthcare program, provides comprehensive coverage. Many people often apply for SSI because of the health care.

SSI benefits are typically lower than SSDI benefits. The average SSI payment as of 2017 is $735 a month for an individual and $1,103 a month for a couple; both of whom must be eligible for the SSI program. Any additional income you receive will reduce your SSI benefits.

What is Social Security Disability Insurance?

SSDI is an entitlement program. The program does not take into account the income or assets of an individual. This means you can apply for SSDI even if you’re earning a high income.

SSDI benefits are based on the earning records of an individual, payments can end up being very high in some cases. Most recipients receive SSDI payments between $700 and $1700 a month.

One of the key benefits of the SSDI program is that individuals who will be eligible for Medicare two years after they’ve been receiving benefits. This is beneficial since the medical costs that come from suffering from disabilities can be incredibly substantial. Medicare can help to cover those costs. Following requirements to qualify for SSDI benefits:

  • Unable to work or disabled
  • Job covered by Social Security
  • Younger than 65
  • You receive paid Social Security taxes on your income for at least a decade

When applying for Social Security Disability benefits, you should be screened for both SSDI disability and SSI. When you make a disability claim for SSI, one requirement by the Social Security Administration you may encounter is to provide financial records including bank statements, lease agreements, etc. This holiday season, if you have more questions about SSI or SSDI contact Social Security Disability Advocates USA today!

Have More Questions about Social Security?

We know that Social Security can be confusing to deal with, so contact Social Security Disability Advocates USA for help. We can be reached 24/7 at (602) 952-3200. Consultations are free, so don’t hesitate to contact us.

The information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, a representative-client relationship.

Do Your Children Qualify for Social Security Benefits?

Do Your Children Qualify for Social Security Benefits?

child social security benefits
Have questions about child social security benefits? Contact us today!

Social Security isn’t just for adults. Your children may be eligible for child social security benefits based on certain conditions. So, let us at Social Security Disability Advocates break down some of the basics for you.

Social Security Disability Insurance

If you become disabled and are eligible for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), your child may be eligible for benefits, too. The Social Security Administration (SSA) considers biological children, adopted children, and dependent step-children to be children of a disabled individual. Generally, children must be younger than 18 years old. Your children must also have a valid birth certificate and social security number. Grandchildren and step-grandchildren may also qualify, but only if 1) their parents are no longer living, 2) they have lived with you for 12 months (or if under a year old, their whole lives), and 3) you provide at least half of their financial support.

The amount of SSDI benefits your children receive is dependent on how much you receive in SSDI benefits. The Social Security Administration puts a family limit of approximately 150% – 180% of your SSDI benefits. This means that if, for example, your family limit were 150% and you have two children, each child would receive 25% of your benefit. This is because you still receive 100% of your benefit, and both children receiving 25% make up the remaining 50%.

Your children will generally stop receiving benefits the month before they turn 18, unless they are still in high school. In that case, they will stop receiving benefits after they graduate or two months after they turn 19. If your child became disabled before age 22, they may continue receiving benefits indefinitely under some conditions.

Supplemental Security Income

Unlike SSDI, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) can be given only to individuals who make little to no income and are 65 or older, blind, or disabled. SSI benefits cannot do not apply to a child based on a parent’s disability status. However, if the child suffers from a disability and makes little to no income, they may be eligible for SSI. The amount of SSI given varies state to state, so visit your local Social Security office for more exact information regarding payment. For 2018, children must meet the following requirements to qualify under the disability definition, and therefore be eligible for SSI:

  •         A child who is not blind must not earn more than $1,180 a month. A child who is blind must not earn more than $1,970 a month (these earning change annually)
  •         The child must have a physical condition, mental condition, or a combined physical and mental condition that result in “marked and severe functional limitations.” In other words, the child’s disability must severely limit their activities.
  •         The child’s condition must have been disabling, or expected to be disabling for a minimum of 12 months, or the condition must be expected to result in death.

When applying for SSI for your child, you will need information such as school records, medical records, and other such documents that give information about your child’s disability.

Still Have Questions About Child Social Security Benefits?

Contact Social Security Disability Advocates today! We work hard for you, and we are always available to answer your questions. Give us a call anytime at (602) 952-3200. If you prefer to contact us online, visit our website and check out our LiveChat feature.

The information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute a representative-client relationship.

7 Mistakes to Avoid When Filing Claim for Social Security Disability Benefits

7 Mistakes to Avoid When Filing Claim for Social Security Disability Benefits

Common Mistake Filing for SSDI Benefits

If you have a disability that is preventing you from being able to work and it meets all eligibility requirements established by the Social Security Administration (SSA), then you may qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). However, just because you should qualify doesn’t mean you will. In fact, it’s estimated that around 65 percent of all first-time applicants are rejected.

It’s important to understand that a rejection may not mean that you don’t qualify; instead, the reasoning is often minor and procedural. Approvals more likely occur during the appeal process than during your initial application.

Of course, you’ll want to do everything that you can to increase your chances of an approval during the initial Social Security disability claim process. Which mean that you’ll want to make sure you don’t make any mistakes on your application.

Common Social Security Disability Application Mistakes to Avoid

The following are seven of the most common mistakes that first-time applicants make that typically result in a rejection:

You provide incomplete information

The SSA requires detailed information about a lot of different things in order to come to a conclusion regarding your eligibility. This includes information about your medical history, your education, your employment and more. If you don’t provide all of the information requested, your application will most likely end up rejected.

There’s conflicting or incorrect information

Be very careful about the information you provide. If any of the statements you make conflict with facts that you provide, it can cause a rejection. Additionally, something as simple as spelling the name of your doctor incorrectly can result in a rejected application. So make sure that you go through your application thoroughly to make sure everything is correct. One way to ensure everything is in order is to review your old medical bills and prescription medication statements. You should also avoid inflating any claims in order to improve your chances of an approval.

You did not properly attempt to treat your condition

If you didn’t follow your doctor’s recommended treatments or if you stopped going to see the doctor, the SSA will assume that you didn’t make the effort to overcome your disability. This can also result in a rejection notice. There are a few exceptions. For example, if you’ve undergone numerous treatments recommended by your doctor and none of them worked, then it’s clear why you may have decided against further treatment suggestions.

You apply for benefits too soon

You need to be able to prove that your disability will keep you from working for at least 12 months. If you can’t, the claims rep or medical examiner could assume that your condition may improve before that time.

Your condition isn’t considered severe enough

Make sure that you look through the Blue Book to determine if your disability or its symptoms match with those listed by the SSA as being defined as disabling.

You don’t have enough medical evidence

Make sure that you’ve gathered enough medical evidence. Not only to prove that you suffer from a disability, but that it has or will prevent you from being able to work. This means that you’ll need to submit any official diagnosis made by your doctor and statements they made about your ability to work as well as any other medical records you may have, such as medical tests or hospital visit records.

You’re still working

If you’re still working, there’s a good chance that the SSA will see this as proof that your disability won’t prevent you from working.

SSDA USA Information

When applying for Social Security disability benefits, make sure that you avoid making these common mistakes. By doing so, your chances of being approved will improve significantly. For more professional guidance concerning the Social Security disability benefits application process, be sure to set up a free consultation with one of our experts at Social Security Disability Advocates USA by calling us at (602) 952-3200.

The information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute a representative-client relationship.