Tag: SSDI

Can You Work Part-Time on Social Security Disability?

Can You Work Part-Time on Social Security Disability?

working part-time on disability

Whether you’re already receiving benefits or are just starting the social security disability application process, you may be wondering if working part-time on disability is an option. Even if you qualify for the maximum monthly disability benefits amount, you may still be looking at a significant decrease in your monthly income. The ability to hold down a part-time job could help you make the economic transition easier.

For this reason, the Social Security Administration (SSA) offers incentives and Ticket to Work programs for qualifying disability benefits recipients, which means you may be able to work a part-time job and still receive monthly benefits. Learn more about these programs and how to maximize your earnings from Social Security Disability Advocates USA.

Trial Work Period

A trial work period is a nine-month period which allows you to test your ability to work. During this time, you are allowed to work as much or as little as you are able to without giving up any of your monthly benefits. In order to use a trial work period, you’ll need to report your work to the SSA and you must still be disabled. 

As of 2020, any earnings over $910 per month automatically qualify you for a trial work period. The nine months of work may be consecutive or may amount to nine months of work within a 60-month period. As long as you do not work more than nine months in this time while earning over $910 per month and you are still disabled, you can still collect full benefits during your trial work period. 

Extended Period of Eligibility

After your trial work period expires, you may be granted an additional 36-month extended period of eligibility. In this case, you can continue working part-time on disability while collecting full benefits as long as your earnings are not considered by the SSA to be “substantial”.

The SSA defines Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) as any monthly earnings over $1,260 except for those who receive disability for vision problems. Blind workers may earn up to $2,110 per month during an extended period of eligibility. The extended period of eligibility is helpful to many because it does not require you to reapply for disability benefits.

Expedited Reinstatement

Some people worry that working part-time on disability may disqualify them for benefits, and that they will have to start the application or appeals process all over again. However, this isn’t always the case. 

With expedited reinstatement, if you lose your benefits because you start earning too much from working, the SSA will give you five years to ask for reinstatement of your disability benefits if your condition prevents you from working again. While the SSA will again review your medical condition, your benefits will restart immediately in the interim.

Ticket to Work

The Ticket to Work program is a special incentive offered by the SSA to help disabled workers find employment and become financially independent. This voluntary program is available to those receiving benefits who are between the ages of 18 and 64, and whose intentions are to prepare for a long-term, possibly full-time career. 

Whether you are returning to the workforce or just starting out, Ticket to Work provides disability recipients with resources like Employment Networks (EN) and Vocational Rehabilitation (VR). Employment Networks help you find a career counselor, assist with job placement, and let you know how your new job may affect your benefits.

Vocational Rehabilitation is more intensive, offering training, education, and rehabilitation. VR services can help you get funding for college classes and also provide you with equipment that can mitigate the impact of your disability. This may include vehicle modification, cochlear implants, prosthetics or eye surgeries, and motorized scooters to help you with getting around more easily. 

Over time, resources like VR and EN can help you secure a good-paying job so that you no longer require disability benefits without losing your Medicaid or Medicare health benefits. At the same time, if you ever are unable to work again because of your disability, expedited reinstatement can help you with cash benefits while your medical condition is reevaluated by the SSA.

Working Part-Time on Disability: Is It Worth It?

If you’re considering working part-time on disability, there are several factors to keep in mind. 

  • How much you’ll earn per month as a part-time worker is key. If you will be making under $910 a month in 2020, this won’t trigger a trial work period and your benefits should remain the same.
  • If you make over $910 per month, you should carefully keep track of your trial work period. If you’re earning over this amount for more than nine months in a 60-month period, you could be at risk of losing your benefits if the SSA decides you are fit to work. 
  • If you continue working after your trial work period, you must keep in mind that any Substantial Gainful Activity (that is, monthly earnings over $1,260) after your extended period of eligibility can compromise your benefits.
  • If you are interested in returning to the workforce full-time, the Ticket to Work program may be right for you. It may mean giving up your cash benefits, but in return you may find yourself in a rewarding and financially stable career. 

Have Questions About Social Security Disability Benefits?

To get help with applying for Social Security programs, appealing a decision, or just to talk about your legal options, contact Social Security Disability Advocates USA. 

We’ll schedule a free consultation to review your case and help you decide if working part-time on disability is right for you. Call us today at 602-952-3200, chat with us via LiveChat or send us a message using our secure contact form

Looking for more information? Check out the ultimate disability secrets the SSA doesn’t want you to know and follow us on Facebook.

Will I Still Be Eligible for Medicaid if I Start Getting Social Security Disability?

Will I Still Be Eligible for Medicaid if I Start Getting Social Security Disability?

Medicaid and disability

If you’re considering applying for Social Security disability benefits and are currently on Medicaid, you may be wondering what will happen to your health insurance if you get approved. 

Will you get to keep your current benefits? Will you have to pay out of pocket for a new health insurance plan? 

With the cost of American healthcare constantly on the rise, many applicants worry that qualifying for disability will ultimately cost them in the long run. In this post, Social Security Disability Advocates USA clears up some common misconceptions about Medicaid and disability and explains how to get the coverage you need.

The Difference Between Medicaid and Medicare

Before proceeding, it’s important to understand the difference between Medicaid and Medicare. Medicaid is a federal government assistance program managed by individual states. It helps low-income individuals and families by providing free or very low-cost healthcare coverage. 

Medicare, on the other hand, is a federal government assistance program run by the federal government. It provides Americans who are over the age of 65 and/or have a qualifying disability with generally low-cost healthcare coverage. How much you ultimately pay for healthcare under Medicare varies depending on the Social Security taxes you’ve paid in the past.

The Difference Between SSI and SSDI Benefits

It’s also important to note the difference between Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). Some people may receive benefits from one program or the other, while other recipients may qualify for payments from both.

SSI is a program designed to assist those who are over the age of 65, blind, or otherwise disabled and who also have limited income or financial resources. SSI recipients do not need to have a certain number of work credits to obtain benefits. As of April 2020, the average monthly benefit for SSI is $576.47. 

SSDI benefits provide assistance to those with a qualifying disability who have also amassed a sufficient number of work credits. As of April 2020, the average benefits for SSDI is $1,121.75 per month.

If You’re On Medicaid and Qualify for SSI

If you are already on Medicaid in your state and you qualify for SSI, you will remain eligible for Medicaid as long as you continue to meet the state-specific requirements for Medicaid. Your SSI benefits will not be included as income when determining eligibility for Medicaid. However, if you receive SSI only, Medicare benefits will not be available to you until you reach the age of 65.

If You’re On Medicaid and Qualify for SSDI

If you are already on Medicaid in your state and you qualify for SSDI (but you do not also qualify for SSI), you will automatically qualify for Medicare after a 24-month waiting period. This waiting period begins five months after the date your qualifying disability began. These additional five months account for the required waiting period before you are eligible to receive disability in the first place.

Thus, if the onset of your disability was more than two years before you were approved for SSDI benefits, you may be able to begin receiving Medicare benefits sooner. Keep in mind that the Social Security Administration only allows retroactive disability payments up to twelve months, meaning your disability onset date may only be recognized as late as 17 months before the day you applied for benefits (taking into account the five-month waiting period). 

As such, your actual waiting period for Medicare could be as little as one year, as opposed to two years and five months. Medicaid may be available in the meantime for those awaiting Medicare coverage.

If You’re On Medicaid and Qualify for SSI and SSDI

If you are already on Medicaid in your state and you qualify for both SSI and SSDI benefits, there is no hard and fast rule on whether you’ll qualify for Medicaid or Medicare. In some cases, it may be possible to receive Medicaid and Medicare benefits simultaneously. Remember that when it comes to Medicaid, although SSI does not count as income, SSDI does.

Need Help Applying for Disability Benefits?

Applying for disability benefits can be a long, confusing, and frustrating process. Waiting periods and application denials are an unfortunately common occurrence. At Social Security Disability Advocates USA, we have the skill and the experience needed to successfully secure disability benefits in the easiest, quickest manner possible. 

If you have questions about Medicaid and disability, contact us today for a free no-obligation consultation. We’ll review your case to give you the best picture of all your legal options. Call us at 602-952-3200. You can also get in touch with us using our LiveChat feature or by sending us the details of your claim through our contact form.

To find out more ultimate disability secrets, you can follow us on Facebook.

This is attorney advertising. SSDA, LLC is a group of attorneys that pursues claims for Social Security Disability benefits on behalf of its clients against the Social Security Administration. SSDA, LLC is in no way a part of the Social Security Administration. Further, the information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, a representative-client relationship.
Will I Get a Coronavirus Stimulus Check if I’m on Disability?

Will I Get a Coronavirus Stimulus Check if I’m on Disability?

coronavirus stimulus check

Economic impact payments began posting to some Americans’ bank accounts on April 13, 2020, marking the first wave of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES).

With more than 16 million Americans out of a job in just the past month, many households are eagerly awaiting their coronavirus stimulus check. The economic stimulus seems simple at first glance—as long as you make under $75,000 a year (or under $150,000 if you file taxes jointly), you’re guaranteed a $1,200 check, correct?

Unfortunately, it’s a little more complicated than that. Trying to understand whether or not you’re eligible to receive the stimulus provided by the CARES Act when you also receive social security disability benefits can be confusing. To help clear things up, Social Security Disability Advocates USA has created this helpful guide to coronavirus stimulus checks.

I’m On Disability. Will I Receive a Coronavirus Stimulus Check?

Yes, you are eligible to receive an economic impact payment even if you are receiving SSDI benefits. The only exception to this is if you receive social security disability, but are still being claimed as a dependent by someone else. Your payment may also be reduced if you have additional income that contributes to a yearly income more than $75,000. 

In addition to a standard $1,200 payment, those receiving disability benefits are eligible to receive an additional $500 for each child who is under the age of 17, provided that they live with you for more than half of the year.

Will I Receive a Payment Even Though I Didn’t File a Tax Return?

You do not need to have filed a tax return in the past two years in order to qualify for the coronavirus stimulus check. The IRS will automatically send you a payment. 

However, please note that in order to receive the $500 payment for dependent children, you will need to either file (or have filed) your taxes for 2018 or 2019. Alternatively, you can submit non-filer information to the IRS to ensure that you receive the proper payment.

Will I Receive a Paper Check or Direct Deposit?

If you are currently receiving monthly SSDI benefits, your coronavirus stimulus check will be sent to you in whatever form you receive your ongoing benefits. If your benefits automatically deposit in your bank account, your economic impact payment will also be directly deposited into the same account.

If you still receive a monthly mailed check for your disability benefits, your economic stimulus check will be mailed to the same address where you receive your SSDI check. The Social Security Administration strongly encourages SSDI recipients to sign up for direct deposit to prevent payment delays and theft. 

If you need to update or change your mailing or banking information, you can do so using your My Social Security account or by calling 1-800-772-1213.

When Will My Coronavirus Stimulus Check Arrive?

The IRS is expected to begin distributing checks electronically beginning on April 13, 2020. These payments will likely be distributed over several waves in the coming weeks. By April 17, the IRS should be debuting a new tracking tool called Get My Payment. This web portal will allow people to track when their economic stimulus check will be arriving and update their address or direct deposit information if they have not received their payment already.

The IRS is expected to begin mailing out paper checks in early May, beginning with low-income beneficiaries.

I’m Applying for Disability Benefits. Where Can I Get Help?

With recent SSA office closures, getting help with checking your SSDI application status or appealing your denial is more complicated. For the ultimate disability secrets and help with your individual case, contact our legal team at Social Security Disability Advocates USA. 

You can reach us by calling 602-952-3200, speaking with a live representative via our LiveChat feature, or by submitting the details of your case using our contact form. Contact us today to get help applying for the benefits you deserve!

This is attorney advertising. SSDA, LLC is a group of attorneys that pursues claims for Social Security Disability benefits on behalf of its clients against the Social Security Administration. SSDA, LLC is in no way a part of the Social Security Administration. Further, the information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, a representative-client relationship.
Are Social Security Disability Benefits Taxable?

Are Social Security Disability Benefits Taxable?

disability and taxes

Filing taxes can be confusing. It can be even more confusing when you receive social security disability benefits. Find out more about disability and taxes from Social Security Disability Advocates USA.

In light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the deadline to file your 2019 tax return has been extended to July 15, 2020.

Disability and Taxes: What You Should Know

If you receive social security disability benefits, you may be wondering if your benefits count as income for tax purposes. Read on to find out everything you need to know about disability and taxes, brought to you by the experienced representatives at Social Security Disability Advocates.

Is Disability Considered Earned Income?

Social security disability benefits are distributed monthly, usually in the form of direct deposit. In this way, disability is income. But when it comes to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), all income is not treated the same. For taxation purposes, the IRS distinguishes between two kinds of income: earned and unearned. Earned income includes the wages, salaries, or tips one gets from employment or self-employment. 

Other types of income, including child support, alimony, retirement income, and disability benefits are all considered unearned income. In short, although disability benefits are income, the way the federal government taxes this income differs from traditional earned income.

Do I Have To Pay Taxes On Disability Benefits?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) reports that only about one third of SSDI recipients ultimately pay taxes on their benefits each year. Virtually no beneficiaries who receive Supplemental Security Income will pay taxes on these benefits, as they are already designated for low-income individuals.

To put it simply, almost all income—including disability benefits—can be subject to taxation. However, whether or not you’ll be required to pay taxes on your disability benefits depends on the following key factors.

Additional Income

You will only be required to pay federal taxes on your disability income if your total income exceeds the threshold limit set by the federal government. You can calculate your total income by adding half the amount of your disability benefits to any additional income. The current threshold if you file individually is $25,000 annually.

The portion of your disability income that is subject to taxation depends on by how much your total income exceeds the federal threshold. If your total income is between $25,000 and $34,000, you can expect a maximum of 50% of your disability income to be considered taxable. If your total income exceeds $34,000, up to 85% of your disability benefits may be taxable. 

Marital Status

If you are married and/or are filing jointly, you are subject to a slightly higher income threshold of $32,000 annually between you and your spouse. When filing jointly, you may still only count half of your disability benefits towards your total income.

If you and your partner have a total income between $32,000 and $44,000, up to 50% of your disability income may be taxed. If you and your partner’s total income exceeds $44,000, as much as  85% of your SSDI benefits may be taxed.

Note: The amount of tax you’ll actually pay on your disability benefits (and additional income) is determined by your marginal tax rate. For example, an individual whose total income is mid-range (between $25,000 and $34,000) would likely only pay between a 15% to 25% tax rate on benefits, while those earning above $34,000 could possibly pay a 35% tax rate on their benefits. 

Where You Live

Your state’s tax laws have some bearing on whether or not you’ll pay taxes on your SSDI benefits. While many states automatically do not tax social security, thirteen states have exceptions to this rule. Generally speaking, these taxes act similarly with regard to federal income thresholds.

Need Help With Social Security Disability Benefits?

Knowing what to expect when it comes to disability and taxes can be confusing. Our social security disability advocates have years of experience assisting clients in obtaining the disability benefits they deserve. 

For more on the ultimate disability secrets the Social Security Administration doesn’t want you to know about and how to get the most monthly compensation for your disability, contact Social Security Disability Advocates USA. 

Not sure how to check on your SSDI application status? We’ve got you covered. You can reach us by phone at 602-952-3200, visit our office during regular business hours, chat online with an representative, or submit the details of your case using our secure contact form.

This is attorney advertising. SSDA, LLC is a group of attorneys that pursues claims for Social Security Disability benefits on behalf of its clients against the Social Security Administration. SSDA, LLC is in no way a part of the Social Security Administration. Further, the information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, a representative-client relationship.
Has Your SSDI Stopped?

Has Your SSDI Stopped?

SSDI stopped
Has your SSDI stopped? Call SSDA USA today!

So, your Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) stopped. You’re probably wondering, “How could this happen?” Well, you’re not alone, and Social Security Disability Advocates USA is here to help.

There are a multitude of factors that influence your SSDI, everything from medical improvement to incarceration. It can be overwhelming to keep track of all the variables, so let us from Social Security Disability Advocates USA clarify some of the key issues surrounding your SSDI and explore some plausibilities for why your SSDI stopped.

You Went Back to Work

Going back to work is one of the most likely reasons for the reduction or cancellation of your SSDI benefits. SSDI requires that you not earn an amount equal to or above the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) limit, which in 2019 is $1,220 per month for non-blind people or $2,040 per month for blind people.

Earning the SGA or above will initiate a nine-month trial work period in which you will still receive SSDI benefits. If you continue to engage in SGA after the nine-month trial work period, you will no longer be considered disabled, and your benefits will stop.

If you are unable to work after your SSDI stopped, you don’t have to reapply for benefits all over again. You can apply for an Expedited Reinstatement (EXR) of benefits. This is so people who unsuccessfully tried to go back to work can more readily reinstate their benefits if they lost their job after their trial work period.

Be careful, though! If you are working but earning below the SGA, the Social Security Administration (SSA) may still determine that the fact you are working means you are no longer disabled. The SGA is just a definite no-go zone for people working; you can still see a reduction or a cancellation of your benefits even if you do not engage in SGA. Of course, individual cases vary, so contact SSDA USA if you have any questions about your SSDI.

You Reached Retirement Age

The SSA prevents you from receiving disability and retirement benefits concurrently. Therefore, once you reach retirement age, your SSDI benefits will stop and you will be eligible for retirement benefits. You do not have to apply for Social Security retirement benefits right away, however. Delaying your retirement benefits can be extremely beneficial for many people. Just keep in mind, though, that your SSDI will stop once you reach retirement age. You should plan ahead for this and save up as much as you can to prepare for a change in your Social Security Benefits.

You Were Incarcerated or Institutionalized

Incarceration or institutionalization can suspend your benefits until you are free again. You will see a suspension of your SSDI benefits after 30 days of incarceration unless you willingly participate in a rehabilitation program. You should see a reinstatement of your SSDI in the month following your release.

Sometimes, you will see a cancellation of your SSDI even without any incarceration. For example, a felony conviction will automatically cancel your SSDI benefits.

Your Dependent’s Benefits Stopped

If you are receiving SSDI based on someone else’s earning record, your benefits may stop if certain changes occur. For example, if you are a child receiving benefits from your parent’s SSDI, your benefits could stop when you turn 18 or get married. Dependent’s benefits are usually different from primary benefits, so different rules apply. If you are a dependent, you should always be aware of what will affect your benefits.

Your Condition Improved

So, your condition has seen a medical improvement. That’s great, right? Well, it’s tricky.

If your condition sees a “medical improvement,” as the SSA calls it, your Social Security benefits could stop. This is because if your condition sees a medical improvement, the SSA may no longer consider you disabled.

Now, what is a medical improvement? According to SSA, “Medical improvement is any decrease in the medical severity of your impairment(s) which was present at the time of the most recent favorable medical decision that you were disabled or continued to be disabled. A determination that there has been a decrease in medical severity must be based on improvement in the symptoms, signs, and/or laboratory findings associated with your impairment(s).”

Now this may sound all fancy, but it simply means this: if your condition has improved to the point that you can work or potentially earn SGA, you will no longer be considered disabled. This means that medical improvement does not necessarily mean you will no longer be considered disabled. If you can prove that you cannot work and cannot earn SGA despite your medical improvement, you will still likely receive your SSDI benefits.

Wondering Why Your SSDI Stopped?

Contact Social Security Disability Advocates today! We are professionals, and we work tirelessly to address all your concerns. Call us anytime at 602-952-3200. Alternatively, you can contact us online or check out our LiveChat feature. Don’t let your questions bother you any longer. Contact SSDA USA today!

This is attorney advertising. SSDA, LLC is a group of attorneys that pursues claims for Social Security Disability benefits on behalf of its clients against the Social Security Administration. SSDA, LLC is in no way a part of the Social Security Administration. Further, the information on this blog is for general information purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, a representative-client relationship.